Mange spader stilt opp i skredområdet i Longyearbyen, etter graving etter omkomne.

A force more deadly than polar bears

You might think that polar bears— and the potential for attack— are the biggest danger on the Norwegian island archipelago of Svalbard. But avalanches kill far more people on Svalbard than polar bears ever have.

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Martin’s world

Visualizing oil reservoirs or tectonic plates under the seafloor requires lots of computing power and the imagination to envision what the data are showing you. That’s Martin Landrø’s work world. But he’s also fascinated by how teachers from a century ago taught their students about the Earth and the way it moves around the sun.

This map shows the changing US CO2 footprint around the world between 1970 and 2008. Red hotspots illustrated where the US carbon footprint has increased, and in blue, decreased. The carbon footprint has gone down in some parts of the US, UK, and other places in Africa and Eastern Europe, while new emissions hotspots have emerged in growing US cities, Mexico, Europe, and throughout Asia. Graphic: Daniel Moran, NTNU

Global hot spot maps link consumers with impacts

A new model creates global hot spot maps to illuminate how what we buy pollutes the planet and where. The idea is to help governments, industries and individuals target areas for cleanup.

Optical fibers lit in the shape of the world map. 3D image concept of global communication by optical fiber.

Glass fibres with potential far beyond transmitting light

Fibre optics are at the heart of today’s communication systems, a number of medical devices and more. But when researchers put a silicon-germanium mix at the core of the fibre and treated it, they made something with potential far beyond transmitting light.

Olga Lehmann examines what silence does to people—and how to use silence in therapy. Photo: Stein Roar Leite

Silence as a superpower

Silence is not an empty space. It has its own purpose, both in psychotherapy and in music. Olga Lehmann is working to build a theory of silence.

Norway's electric companies need to be forward thinking while at the same time continuing to do what they are good at. Photo: Thinkstock

Helping today’s power companies anticipate tomorrow

It’s not easy for big, profitable companies to respond to huge technological changes. One NTNU researcher hopes to help Norway’s electric power industry cope with the market challenges from renewable energy and changed consumer behaviour.

Oere Foto Michael Müller (ETH Zürich)

New ears from algae

Scientists are using alginate from seaweed to try to get cells to form new body parts.

Photo: Anais Orsi
VIDEO

Lazarus ice

Global climate change is causing Arctic sea ice to melt at an accelerating rate, increasing the ability of ships and other structures to travel though Arctic waters. But even as they melt, some sea ice structures actually get stronger.

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Jellyfish invaders: Trondheim Fjord in transition

Jarle Mork has spent the last 40 years of his career studying Trondheim Fjord and its finned inhabitants. Warmer waters and the arrival of new creatures are bad news for the fjord’s cod population, he says. But other fishing practices are problematic, too.

Trondheim 08.06.2016 : The leading technical universities in the Nordic countries (Aalto, Chalmers, DTU, KTH and NTNU) celebrate their 10th anniversary of collaboration with a high level summit in Trondheim 8 June 2016. The purpose of the summit is to establish a unique networking arena for key actors in the Nordic innovation eco-systems. Photo: Thor Nielsen
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Five Nordic universities look into the crystal ball

The Nordic Five Tech, an alliance of the leading technical universities in the Nordic countries, celebrated its tenth anniversary this June with a high level summit to plot a strategy for its next decade. There was talk of horses, cars, and swimming robot snakes.

small premature baby lies in an incubator a grown hand reaches in grasping the foot in caring manner

Premature babies may grow up to have weaker bones

Low birth weight babies are at higher risk of osteoporosis later in life, especially if they are born prematurely. Targeting these children with the appropriate diet and weight-bearing exercise can help improve the problem.

Photo: Jofrid Skardhamar

Uncovering the secrets of Arctic seabird colonies

Seabirds nest by the hundreds of thousands in colonies along the Norwegian coast. By combining an ocean current model with fish larvae transport modeling and bird population numbers, Norwegian researchers have uncovered the factors that help determine the location of seabird nesting colonies.

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Japan-Norway Arctic Science and Innovation Week

Representatives from Japanese and Norwegian universities, research institutions, government agencies and industries interested in polar issues will gather in Tokyo in early June to present research results and build partnerships.

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NTNU builds bridges to Japan

Starting today, Hiroshito Matsumoto will work from a base in Toyko on behalf of NTNU and the University of Bergen to build new research partnerships between Japan and Norway.

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Freezing plants to predict the fate of the Arctic

Global warming means much warmer winters in the Arctic, with more rain and icing. Researchers are working to understand what that will do to plants that have evolved to overwinter under a thick blanket of snow.

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Keeping Arctic villages, infrastructure from falling into the sea

The Arctic is set to be a 21st century boomtown, as summer sea ice melts away, opening the area to increased trans-Arctic shipping and oil and gas development. A new understanding of Arctic coastal erosion offers clues to how to best protect the docks and other infrastructure this development will bring.

Even though electric cars are everywhere in Trondheim (here at St Olavs Hospital) and in Norway, CO2 emissions from transport are a substantial part of Norway's greenhouse gas emissions. Photo: Nancy Bazilchuk, NTNU

Hacking Trondheim to cut greenhouse gas emissions

NTNU and Norway’s technological capital—Trondheim—hosted a Climathon to give the city the tools it needs to make ambitious greenhouse gas cuts. The results might be helpful to other cities around the globe that face the same problem.

Household waste sorting and recycling kitchen bins in the drawer. Collecting food leftovers for composting. Environmentally responsible behavior, ecology concept.
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Food waste recycling not always the best idea

With Norway as a case study, a first-ever effort to quantify the benefits of recycling food waste versus preventing it shows prevention is the best policy. But Norway continues to invest significant funds in biogas facilities for food waste recycling.

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Iron-age Norwegians liked their bling

Norway’s Main Air Station at Ørland will be expanded to house the country’s new F-35 fighter jets. Archaeologists called in to examine the expansion site before construction have found evidence of Iron Age longhouses, complete with glass shards, beads and lots of garbage.