Energy and environment

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Hope for the climate, hope for clean air

Climate talks in New York this week have offered a glimmer of hope that the world’s political leaders finally understand the need to act to curb global warming. An NTNU researcher says that these actions will have a beneficial side effect: cleaner air in some of the most polluted places on the planet.

The Towing Tank's opening ceremony in 1939. Photo: Schrøder, Sverresborg Trøndelag Folkemuseum

The Towing Tank turns 75

NTH, Norway’s first technical university and one of the main predecessors to NTNU, SINTEF and MARINTEK, opened in Trondheim in 1910. Just three years later its scientists began to think very big – 170 metres big.

We know that hormone mimics are harmful to us, and that they don’t break down naturally", says Per Stenstad.  They  accumulate in waste water and soil". Photo: Thor Nielsen.

Capturing false hormones

They damage our ability to reproduce, and they pollute the natural environment. Yet chemicals known as hormone mimics can be found in consumer goods. Eventually they end up in our water. But we now have a way of capturing them.

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Monitoring neighbourhood electricity consumption

With more and more Norwegian households owning one or even two electric cars requiring charging overnight, how will we manage without sacrificing our hot morning shower and fresh bread for breakfast?

Brown trout or sea trout.
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The secret life of the sea trout

Armed with special acoustic tags, a team of researchers is following 50 individual fish for as long as seven months to learn more about their life – and death — in Norwegian fjords.

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What do we do when a well blows out?

Oil and gas companies are worried about gas discharges at the sea bed. Recent field experiments can now quantify the volumes of gas reaching the sea surface and how they spread in the atmosphere.

Discovery Channel Canada videographer Mark Foerester films a 20 kg block of ice that is about to be catapulted into a steel beam. Photo: Nancy Bazilchuk

Celebrity ice

Not since the Titanic has a block of ice been quite so famous. In early June, Discovery Channel Canada came to NTNU’s Structural Impact Laboratory (SIMLab) to watch ice researchers from NTNU’s Sustainable Arctic Marine and Coastal Technology programme use a giant machine to simulate what happens when a ship slams into an iceberg.

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Lopwood and brushwood make high-grade charcoal

When the forestry machines have finished extracting timber, what is left are tops and branches – waste which cannot be used. However, according to researchers, it is possible to turn these heaps of lopwood into high-quality charcoal.

Three of our contributing researchers talk about the challenges we face. Photo: Thinkstock

A global challenge

Three climate researchers talk about the latest report from Intergovernmental panel on climate change (IPCC). In English, French and Italian.

Katja Kim, a PhD candidate working with NTNU's Sustainable Arctic Marine and Coastal Technology programme (SAMCoT) prepares a metal plate for her ice collision experiments. Photo: Katja Kim

Crash course

As the Arctic Ocean’s summer ice cap melts away, new trans-Arctic shipping routes will open and see a growing amount of shipping traffic. But what’s the best way to protect ships and other ocean structures if they crash into icebergs?

Seminavis robusta, stained with Aniline Blue, autofluorescence chloroplasts

Learning from algae

By controlling the sex life of algae, scientists can promote the properties they want.

Northern lights

Secrets of the High North

The Norwegian arctic island archipelago of Svalbard offers scientists the chance to investigate some of the most intriguing – and perplexing – puzzles facing the high north.

Illustration: Alexander Somma | Helmet Films & VFX Infinite, 3D Head Scan by Lee Perry-Smith. Based on a work at Infinite-Realities.

Choking on their own growth

The population of the world’s cities is growing by 60 million people a year. What can urban planners do?



Semiconductors grown on graphene

Researchers at NTNU have patented and are commercializing GaAs nanowires grown on graphene, a hybrid material with competitive properties.