Innovation

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Some of the research participants demonstrate how the cyborg works. From left to right are PhD candidate Peter Aaser, ITK Associate Professor Sverre Hendseth, PhD candidate Martinius Knudsen and master’s student Jorgen Walo. Photo: Kai T. Dragland, NTNU
Cyborg

I, Cyborg

Researchers at NTNU are developing a robot that will be controlled by living brain cells.

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New allergy test promises safer antibiotic use

Allergies to antibiotics are the commonest form of medication allergies and, in the worst cases, can result in anaphylaxis and death. SINTEF is participating in the development of a new allergy test that will make it easier to provide patients with safe and correct treatments.

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A future for skiing in a warmer world

As the world struggles to make progress to limit climate change, researchers are finding ways to adapt to warmer winter temperatures — by developing environmentally friendly ways of producing artificial snow.

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VIDEO

Martin’s world

Visualizing oil reservoirs or tectonic plates under the seafloor requires lots of computing power and the imagination to envision what the data are showing you. That’s Martin Landrø’s work world. But he’s also fascinated by how teachers from a century ago taught their students about the Earth and the way it moves around the sun.

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Using Big Data to understand immune system responses

An enzyme found in many bacteria, including the bacterium that gives us strep throat, has given mankind a cheap and effective tool with which to edit our own genes. This technology, called CRISPR, is also being used to understand how the immune system responds to a viral attack.

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VIDEO

Robots that look like us

Japan is at the forefront of building all kinds of different robots, from industrial machines to robots that look like humans and can talk to us. The only purpose for these humanoid robots is to make us happy.

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Microscopic sensor for more precise radiology treatments

A team of Norwegian, French and Australian researchers is the first in the world to succeed in quantifying the effects of radiation on individual cancer cells. This means that radiation therapies can now be tailored to individual tumours and thus be more effective.

Optical fibers lit in the shape of the world map. 3D image concept of global communication by optical fiber.

Glass fibres with potential far beyond transmitting light

Fibre optics are at the heart of today’s communication systems, a number of medical devices and more. But when researchers put a silicon-germanium mix at the core of the fibre and treated it, they made something with potential far beyond transmitting light.

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Help for fishing vessels to locate their catch

Big Data means that professional fishermen will soon be getting their own decision-making tool. It will tell them where fish shoals are located, and how their vessels can be operated as economically as possible.

Trondheim 08.06.2016 : The leading technical universities in the Nordic countries (Aalto, Chalmers, DTU, KTH and NTNU) celebrate their 10th anniversary of collaboration with a high level summit in Trondheim 8 June 2016. The purpose of the summit is to establish a unique networking arena for key actors in the Nordic innovation eco-systems. Photo: Thor Nielsen
VIDEO

Five Nordic universities look into the crystal ball

The Nordic Five Tech, an alliance of the leading technical universities in the Nordic countries, celebrated its tenth anniversary this June with a high level summit to plot a strategy for its next decade. There was talk of horses, cars, and swimming robot snakes.

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VIDEO

Japan-Norway Arctic Science and Innovation Week

Representatives from Japanese and Norwegian universities, research institutions, government agencies and industries interested in polar issues will gather in Tokyo in early June to present research results and build partnerships.

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NTNU builds bridges to Japan

Starting today, Hiroshito Matsumoto will work from a base in Toyko on behalf of NTNU and the University of Bergen to build new research partnerships between Japan and Norway.

Even though electric cars are everywhere in Trondheim (here at St Olavs Hospital) and in Norway, CO2 emissions from transport are a substantial part of Norway's greenhouse gas emissions. Photo: Nancy Bazilchuk, NTNU

Hacking Trondheim to cut greenhouse gas emissions

NTNU and Norway’s technological capital—Trondheim—hosted a Climathon to give the city the tools it needs to make ambitious greenhouse gas cuts. The results might be helpful to other cities around the globe that face the same problem.