Natural science

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When the extreme becomes the norm: Svalbard reindeer cope with dramatic climate change

Climate change is increasing the likelihood of extreme winter rain events in the Arctic. These kinds of winter storms on Norway’s Svalbard archipelago can cause a thick cap of ice to cover the forage that reindeer eat. You’d think that more frequent rain-on-snow events would spell the end for these arctic animals — but you’d be wrong.

How do species adapt to their surroundings?

Several fish species can change sex as needed. Other species adapt to their surroundings by living long lives — or by living shorter lives and having lots of offspring. The ability of animals and plants to change can sometimes manifest in apparently extreme ways.

Ocean life in 3-D: Mapping phytoplankton with a smart AUV

Phytoplankton form the base of the marine food chain but are notoriously difficult for scientists to account for — a little like trying to identify and count motes of dust in the air. A truly independent underwater vehicle shows it can do the job.

Eight myths about your brain

Do we have a dominant brain hemisphere? Do we use our whole brain? Can we train our brains to be smarter? Does our ability to learn depend only on our genetic inheritance?

Solving the mystery of Serengeti’s vanishing wild dogs

Twenty-five years ago, African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) disappeared from Serengeti National Park. A firestorm of debate followed when one researcher claimed that handling by scientists was the cause. New research refutes that claim and offers another explanation.

WITH VIDEO

Eating your veggies, even in space

Travelling to Mars will require astronauts to grow their own food. NTNU is creating the planters for cultivating veggies in space. Now that researchers have finished lettuce-growing experiments, they’ll be embarking on bean trials.

When the hum of insects disappears

Several countries are warning of massive insect deaths. Right now we don’t know how matters stand in Norway. But that’s about to change.

Spending our carbon budgets wisely

Our carbon emissions are much higher than are needed for us to have happy, healthy lives. But cutting these emissions requires us to think differently about how we measure growth and progress.

World’s tiniest circuit takes shape

Components are falling into place for the technology of the future. They can provide smaller, faster and cheaper electronics with minimal energy consumption.

When 80 microns is enough

Should you care that scientists can control a baffling current? Their research results could someday affect your daily living.

New super laboratory coming to Trondheim

Research on minerals and materials is important in helping society make the transition to a greener economy. NTNU, the Geological Survey of Norway and SINTEF have joined forces to establish a national laboratory to that end.

Can windmills and seabirds coexist?

Can offshore wind power be combined with good seabird management? Using GPS to track seabirds, a research project has come up with a surprising answer.

How plants respond to attacks

Plants have to defend themselves against drought, enemies and disease. But different threats demand different responses. So how do plants know what’s attacking them?

Computing power solves molecular mystery

By using a novel combination of two simulation techniques, researchers at NTNU have found a new way to investigate the behaviour of molecules. It’s good news for the chemical industry.

Norwegian public asked to name a species

The moss world will never be the same. The moss Norwegian researchers thought they knew has played a trick on them. In return, researchers are calling on the Norwegian public to name a new species.