Technology

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The astronaut’s extra nose

How do we protect astronauts in space from breathing dangerous gases? A German-Norwegian hi-tech optical gas sensor provides a solution.

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Snake robots in space

Norwegian researchers are investigating how a snake robot might carry out maintenance work on the International Space Station (ISS), study comets, and explore the possibility of living and working in lava tunnels on the Moon.

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Fuel of the future

Heavy-duty trucks will soon be driving around in Trondheim, Norway, fuelled by hydrogen created with solar power, and emitting only pure water vapour as “exhaust”. Not only will hydrogen technology revolutionize road transport, it will also enable ships and trains to run emission-free.

Manual cleaning being carried out at Scatec Solar’s solar energy farm in Jordan. Photo: Mohammad Ba’ra.

An energy-efficient cleaning robot

State-of-the-art solar cells are efficient – but are even more so when they are kept clean. A cleaning robot developed by Norwegian researchers enables solar panels to deliver at full capacity.

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Popularizing science the Brian Cox way

Many of the speakers at the Starmus Festival are superstars in their fields of expertise. But few have as many fans as Brian Cox, the researcher who also feels at home in popular culture.

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Exposing fake news on social media

Facebook is an important source of not only genuine, but also fake news. But now a new tool has been developed to expose the fakers.

1)CHIKYU and Mt. Fuji
VIDEO

Finding life — and farming minerals — deep under the sea

Japanese researchers have access to the largest scientific vessel ever constructed, one that has a 120 metre tall derrick capable of drilling to 7500 metres below the seafloor. They’re using it to hunt for life deep under the seafloor and explore for mineral deposits at the bottom of the ocean — topics that are of great interest to Norwegian researchers.

Some of the research participants demonstrate how the cyborg works. From left to right are PhD candidate Peter Aaser, ITK Associate Professor Sverre Hendseth, PhD candidate Martinius Knudsen and master’s student Jorgen Walo. Photo: Kai T. Dragland, NTNU
Cyborg

I, Cyborg

Researchers at NTNU are developing a robot that will be controlled by living brain cells.

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Air could be the world’s next battery

Storing compressed air in sealed tunnels and mines could be a way of storing energy in the future – if an EU project in which Norway is a partner is successful.

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New allergy test promises safer antibiotic use

Allergies to antibiotics are the commonest form of medication allergies and, in the worst cases, can result in anaphylaxis and death. SINTEF is participating in the development of a new allergy test that will make it easier to provide patients with safe and correct treatments.

Mange spader stilt opp i skredområdet i Longyearbyen, etter graving etter omkomne.

A force more deadly than polar bears

You might think that polar bears— and the potential for attack— are the biggest danger on the Norwegian island archipelago of Svalbard. But avalanches kill far more people on Svalbard than polar bears ever have.