Technology

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The Nobel Dance

2014 NOBEL PRIZE: Nobel laureate and NTNU Professor May-Britt Moser was full of joy when she learned she had won the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with her husband, Edvard Moser, and their former mentor, John O’Keefe.

Ductile materials for Arctic conditions

The production of oil and gas at temperatures between 40 and 60 degrees below zero means that researchers must advance the development of materials that can withstand these harsh conditions.

Robot water pipe inspectors

Norwegian researchers and a small company in Tromsø are taking part in a project aimed at preventing between 30 and 50 per cent of Europe’s drinking water being lost due to pipe leakages.

Turning humble seaweed to biofuel

A Norwegian research group has been able to achieve bio-oil yields of 79% from a common kelp. Other researchers working with the same species have yields closer to 20%. The secret is to heat the kelp very quickly and bring it to the right temperature within seconds.

Stealth medicine

Using nanocapsules containing cancer drugs, researchers have succeeded in attacking tumours with surgical precision. One of the ways to manufacture such capsules is with minute droplets of super glue.

The Towing Tank turns 75

NTH, Norway’s first technical university and one of the main predecessors to NTNU, SINTEF and MARINTEK, opened in Trondheim in 1910. Just three years later its scientists began to think very big – 170 metres big.

Capturing false hormones

They damage our ability to reproduce, and they pollute the natural environment. Yet chemicals known as hormone mimics can be found in consumer goods. Eventually they end up in our water. But we now have a way of capturing them.

Preventing air accidents

A Norwegian, satellite-based system aims to ensure that helicopters and light aircraft are prevented from colliding with power lines and other obstacles.

A symphony of stars

Øyvind Brandtsegg has composed a piece that plays for seven consecutive years based on how gigantic antennas on the Earth rotate to find the most powerful stars in space.

Monitoring neighbourhood electricity consumption

With more and more Norwegian households owning one or even two electric cars requiring charging overnight, how will we manage without sacrificing our hot morning shower and fresh bread for breakfast?

What do we do when a well blows out?

Oil and gas companies are worried about gas discharges at the sea bed. Recent field experiments can now quantify the volumes of gas reaching the sea surface and how they spread in the atmosphere.

Celebrity ice

Not since the Titanic has a block of ice been quite so famous. In early June, Discovery Channel Canada came to NTNU’s Structural Impact Laboratory (SIMLab) to watch ice researchers from NTNU’s Sustainable Arctic Marine and Coastal Technology programme use a giant machine to simulate what happens when a ship slams into an iceberg.

Digital human face

“Virtual human” unlocks key mechanisms of high blood pressure

Scientists regularly use computer models to understand complex problems, from predicting the weather to designing boats and automobiles. Now they are also using this approach to better understand the human body — including the causes behind high blood pressure.

Putting RFID technology to work

From Finnish hockey players to London double-decker buses to rhino horns, the humble RFID chip is hard at work. New software can help companies harness the power of this tiny technology.

Jacket works like a mobile phone

A fire is raging in a large building and the fire leader is sending a message to all firefighters at the scene. But they don’t need a mobile phone – they simply check their jacket sleeves and read the message there.

Building a hybrid fishing boat

It isn’t just car manufacturers that are looking into hybrid energy systems. A Norwegian boat builder is now aiming to become the world’s first supplier of environmentally friendly fishing vessels.

Lifesaving sensor for full bladders

A small pressure sensor can make the difference between life and death. The first tests on humans will be carried out in April on patients with spinal injuries at Sunnaas Hospital in Norway.

Crash course

As the Arctic Ocean’s summer ice cap melts away, new trans-Arctic shipping routes will open and see a growing amount of shipping traffic. But what’s the best way to protect ships and other ocean structures if they crash into icebergs?