Technology

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Monitoring neighbourhood electricity consumption

With more and more Norwegian households owning one or even two electric cars requiring charging overnight, how will we manage without sacrificing our hot morning shower and fresh bread for breakfast?

What do we do when a well blows out?

Oil and gas companies are worried about gas discharges at the sea bed. Recent field experiments can now quantify the volumes of gas reaching the sea surface and how they spread in the atmosphere.

Celebrity ice

Not since the Titanic has a block of ice been quite so famous. In early June, Discovery Channel Canada came to NTNU’s Structural Impact Laboratory (SIMLab) to watch ice researchers from NTNU’s Sustainable Arctic Marine and Coastal Technology programme use a giant machine to simulate what happens when a ship slams into an iceberg.

Digital human face

“Virtual human” unlocks key mechanisms of high blood pressure

Scientists regularly use computer models to understand complex problems, from predicting the weather to designing boats and automobiles. Now they are also using this approach to better understand the human body — including the causes behind high blood pressure.

Putting RFID technology to work

From Finnish hockey players to London double-decker buses to rhino horns, the humble RFID chip is hard at work. New software can help companies harness the power of this tiny technology.

Jacket works like a mobile phone

A fire is raging in a large building and the fire leader is sending a message to all firefighters at the scene. But they don’t need a mobile phone – they simply check their jacket sleeves and read the message there.

Building a hybrid fishing boat

It isn’t just car manufacturers that are looking into hybrid energy systems. A Norwegian boat builder is now aiming to become the world’s first supplier of environmentally friendly fishing vessels.

Lifesaving sensor for full bladders

A small pressure sensor can make the difference between life and death. The first tests on humans will be carried out in April on patients with spinal injuries at Sunnaas Hospital in Norway.

Crash course

As the Arctic Ocean’s summer ice cap melts away, new trans-Arctic shipping routes will open and see a growing amount of shipping traffic. But what’s the best way to protect ships and other ocean structures if they crash into icebergs?

Seminavis robusta, stained with Aniline Blue, autofluorescence chloroplasts

Learning from algae

By controlling the sex life of algae, scientists can promote the properties they want.

Northern lights

Secrets of the High North

The Norwegian arctic island archipelago of Svalbard offers scientists the chance to investigate some of the most intriguing – and perplexing – puzzles facing the high north.

Stress alarm for smoke-divers

Smoke-divers are exposed to high temperatures, physical exhaustion and stress. A new sensor system lets them know when the body has had enough.

Beating the winter blues

The lack of sufficient daylight in northern climes makes many tired and depressed. But don’t worry, researchers have come up with ways to counteract the winter blues.

New material may replace silicon

Norwegian researchers are the world’s first to develop a method for producing semiconductors from graphene. This finding may revolutionise the technology industry.

Semiconductors grown on graphene

Researchers at NTNU have patented and are commercializing GaAs nanowires grown on graphene, a hybrid material with competitive properties.

Better rescue in major disasters

Earthquakes. Tsunamis. Forest fires and terror attacks. Norway and the rest of the world must be prepared for catastrophes.

Ocean prophets

These scientists can predict the direction an oil spill will take, or if salmon lice will infect a neighbouring fish farm.

New renewable energy

New elastic materials that can generate electricity may help make wave power cheaper to develop.