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When 80 microns is enough

Should you care that scientists can control a baffling current? Their research results could someday affect your daily living.

Minerals and Materials for a Sustainable Future

For the first time this week, the Nature Research Group, publishers of Nature, will host an international conference in Trondheim in cooperation with NTNU, SINTEF and the Geological Survey of Norway. The theme for the conference, which runs from 11-13 September, is the sustainable use of minerals and materials.

Using new technology to find shipwrecks on the ocean floor

An estimated three million shipwrecks lie in seabed graveyards around the world – with as many as 1000 of them around Svalbard. Each of them has their own unique story — one that’s made much more accessible with new technology.

How your brain experiences time

Researchers at the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience have discovered a network of brain cells that expresses our sense of time within experiences and memories. The area of the brain where time is experienced is located right next to the area that codes for space.

New super laboratory coming to Trondheim

Research on minerals and materials is important in helping society make the transition to a greener economy. NTNU, the Geological Survey of Norway and SINTEF have joined forces to establish a national laboratory to that end.

Coastal cruise ships with wings on the bow are on the way

Ships with wings? Researchers are piloting this NTNU-spawned technology on new coastal cruise ships now being tested in Trondheim. The wings – or foils – use less fuel and make the journey more comfortable for passengers.

Can windmills and seabirds coexist?

Can offshore wind power be combined with good seabird management? Using GPS to track seabirds, a research project has come up with a surprising answer.

What is community, really?

A community can be anything from people gathered at the same type of music festival to commuters who recognize each other on the train, a quick meeting with colleagues in the cafeteria or an online chat group.

Clothing, furniture play a role in ocean and freshwater pollution

Lakes choked with algae and marine “dead zones” result from too many nutrients in the water. The traditional culprit is agriculture, which relies on fertilizer to boost plant growth. But the production of consumer goods, like clothing, is also a major — and growing — contributor.

Researchers make mini-brains from skin

By reprogramming skin cells to become brain cells, researchers have managed to cultivate lots of mini human brains. Some of them have begun to grow pupils for eyes. The technique helps researchers study the most minute details of the genetics of turning stem cells into other cells.

How plants respond to attacks

Plants have to defend themselves against drought, enemies and disease. But different threats demand different responses. So how do plants know what’s attacking them?

Computing power solves molecular mystery

By using a novel combination of two simulation techniques, researchers at NTNU have found a new way to investigate the behaviour of molecules. It’s good news for the chemical industry.

Norwegian public asked to name a species

The moss world will never be the same. The moss Norwegian researchers thought they knew has played a trick on them. In return, researchers are calling on the Norwegian public to name a new species.

Four World Cup gold medals — and a baby

Marit Bjørgen was a world-class athlete at the top of her career — and then she decided to have a baby. How did that change her ability to train — and her performance afterwards?

Raising better salmon

The aquaculture industry typically selects salmon with the right genes for breeding to provide the freshest and biggest fish. A new method has the potential to produce better results.

Vitamin D deficiency affects many pregnant women

Only one in five women follows the recommendations for taking vitamin D supplements during pregnancy. Vitamin D deficiency can have serious repercussions for the skeletal health of both mother and child.