Starmus

The astronaut’s extra nose

How do we protect astronauts in space from breathing dangerous gases? A German-Norwegian hi-tech optical gas sensor provides a solution.

Snake robots in space

Norwegian researchers are investigating how a snake robot might carry out maintenance work on the International Space Station (ISS), study comets, and explore the possibility of living and working in lava tunnels on the Moon.

Astrophysics a field for great discoveries

As a child, Professor Myrheim wondered what the far side of the Moon looked like. Trondheim’s Starmus festival will welcome a trio who has actually been on the moon, and the astrophysicist is excited to hear their lecture. “Perhaps it’s the magic of childhood that lingers on,” he says.

Moonwalkers three

Just 12 Americans have set foot on the lunar surface, and of those, only six are still alive. Three—Buzz Aldrin, Charlie Duke and Harrison “Jack” Schmitt — will be in Trondheim at the Starmus Science Festival to talk about the future of humankind in space.

Climate change, ocean diversity and women in science

Science has made great strides since Svante Arrhenius, the Swedish Nobel Laureate who in 1896 first determined that carbon dioxide from human activity could warm the planet. The same progress hasn’t been made in increasing the number of women in the sciences.

Will send a giant sunflower into space

Imagine a firefly fluttering near a floodlight. Can you see it? Not unless you shade the light coming from the glare of the lamp. This is where the sunflower screen enters the picture.

Stinky city air as climate art

Imagine breathing polluted New Delhi air. It’s a scorching 40 degrees and the humidity is high. But you’re not in New Delhi – you’re in an art installation, during the Starmus festival in Trondheim in June.

Popularizing science the Brian Cox way

Many of the speakers at the Starmus Festival are superstars in their fields of expertise. But few have as many fans as Brian Cox, the researcher who also feels at home in popular culture.

Eradicating extreme poverty

When Jeffrey D. Sachs (62) comes to Norway in June for the Starmus science festival, attendees will need to fasten their seat belts. The economics professor is described as a “battering ram” and a “bully,” who is ploughing his way to a tough goal: the global eradication of extreme poverty.

Black holes and other star remnants

Imagine a dog owner with a reflective vest and a black dog without one. In the dark we can see how the dog owner moves, but not the dog. That’s how black holes work, too.

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