Innovation

Laste ikon
LOADING CONTENT
WITH VIDEO

Robots that look like us

Japan is at the forefront of building all kinds of different robots, from industrial machines to robots that look like humans and can talk to us. The only purpose for these humanoid robots is to make us happy.

Microscopic sensor for more precise radiology treatments

A team of Norwegian, French and Australian researchers is the first in the world to succeed in quantifying the effects of radiation on individual cancer cells. This means that radiation therapies can now be tailored to individual tumours and thus be more effective.

Glass fibres with potential far beyond transmitting light

Fibre optics are at the heart of today’s communication systems, a number of medical devices and more. But when researchers put a silicon-germanium mix at the core of the fibre and treated it, they made something with potential far beyond transmitting light.

Help for fishing vessels to locate their catch

Big Data means that professional fishermen will soon be getting their own decision-making tool. It will tell them where fish shoals are located, and how their vessels can be operated as economically as possible.

WITH VIDEO

Five Nordic universities look into the crystal ball

The Nordic Five Tech, an alliance of the leading technical universities in the Nordic countries, celebrated its tenth anniversary this June with a high level summit to plot a strategy for its next decade. There was talk of horses, cars, and swimming robot snakes.

WITH VIDEO

Japan-Norway Arctic Science and Innovation Week

Representatives from Japanese and Norwegian universities, research institutions, government agencies and industries interested in polar issues will gather in Tokyo in early June to present research results and build partnerships.

NTNU builds bridges to Japan

Starting today, Hiroshito Matsumoto will work from a base in Toyko on behalf of NTNU and the University of Bergen to build new research partnerships between Japan and Norway.

Drones help find lost sheep

Looking for sheep can be done a lot more effectively than today. A drone may be a farmer’s next tool in finding their lost lambs.

Hacking Trondheim to cut greenhouse gas emissions

NTNU and Norway’s technological capital—Trondheim—hosted a Climathon to give the city the tools it needs to make ambitious greenhouse gas cuts. The results might be helpful to other cities around the globe that face the same problem.

Mirror, mirror, will I have a heart attack?

A new smart mirror containing technology developed by NTNU researchers uses 3D-scanners and cameras to make measurements while you brush your teeth, giving you answers about your health minutes later.

The professor who misses his tail

Professor Dag Svanæs has lectured at Stanford University and is inspired by the philosophers Martin Heidegger and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. He has also had a furry mechanized tail that he still sometimes misses.

Norwegian agri-tech goes global

Norwegian manufacturers of agricultural technology are now getting active support from researchers. Such companies will benefit from new applications and exposure to a global market.

111 days in the ice

Drilling down to understand sea ice

Global warming is upending virtually everything that scientists know about the Arctic ice cap. During the first half of 2015, a multinational team of researchers froze the RV Lance into the Arctic ice to learn more about how this ice has changed. NTNU researchers were among the scientists seeking to learn more about this changing environment.

The jewel in the crown

“Dynamic positioning” has been hailed as “the jewel in the crown” and Norway’s greatest engineering feat since World War II. But what is it?

Recycling aluminium, one can at a time

Producing pure aluminium from ore accounts for as much as 1 per cent of all greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. Recycling is the best way to reduce that carbon footprint – but manufacturers and recycling companies will have to plan carefully to avoid problems with impurities that accumulate in recycled aluminium over time.

A village of neuroscientists

2014 NOBEL PRIZE — There’s a proverb – the origins of which are hotly disputed – that says “It takes a village to raise a child.” You could almost say the same thing about groundbreaking discoveries in neuroscience, if NTNU’s Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience/Centre for Neural Computation (KI/CNC) is any example.

The Towing Tank turns 75

NTH, Norway’s first technical university and one of the main predecessors to NTNU, SINTEF and MARINTEK, opened in Trondheim in 1910. Just three years later its scientists began to think very big – 170 metres big.

Small capsules, big potential

A conversation between two physicists in a Paris café led to the invention of a novel form of capsules that could be used in medicine, food, household products, cosmetics and paints. Their find has just been published in the latest issue of Nature Communications.

Privacy Policy

The Privacy Statement is about how this website collects and uses visitor information. The statement contains information that you are entitled to when collecting information from our website (Personal Information Act, section 19), and general information about how we treat personal data (Personal Data Act, section 18, first paragraph). The legal owner of the website is the processing officer for the processing of personal data. It is voluntary for those who visit the web sites to provide personal information regarding services such as receiving newsletters and using the sharing and tip services. The treatment basis is the consent of the individual, unless otherwise specified.

1. Web analytics and cookies (cookies)

As an important part of the effort to create a user-friendly website, we look at the user pattern of those who visit the site. To analyze the information, we use the Google Analytics analysis tool. Google Analytics uses cookies (small text files that the site stores on the user's computer), which registers the users' IP address and provides information about the individual user's online movements. Examples of what the statistics give us answers to are; how many people visit different pages, how long the visit lasts, what websites users come from and what browsers are used. None of the cookies allow us to link information about your use of the site to you as an individual. The information collected by Google Analytics is stored on Google servers in the U.S.. The information received is subject to the Google Privacy Policy. An IP address is defined as a personal information because it can be traced back to a particular hardware and thus to an individual. We use Google Analytics's tracking code to anonymize the IP address before the information is stored and processed by Google. Thus, the stored IP address can not be used to identify the individual user.

2. Search

If the webpage has search function, it stores information about what keywords users use in Google Analytics. The purpose of the storage is to improve our information service. The search usage pattern is stored in aggregate form. Only the keyword is saved and they can not be linked to other information about the users, such as the IP addresses.

3. Share / Tips service

The "Share with others" feature can be used to forward links to the site by email, or to share the content of social networking. Tips for tips are not logged with us, but only used to add the tips to the community. However, we can not guarantee that the online community does not log this information. All such services should therefore be used wisely. If you use the email feature, we only use the provided email addresses to resend the message without any form of storage.

4. Newsletter

The website can send out newsletters by email if you have registered to receive this. In order for us to be able to send e-mail, you must register an e-mail address. Mailchimp is the data processor for the newsletter. The e-mail address is stored in a separate database, not shared with others and deleted when you unsubscribe. The e-mail address will also be deleted if we receive feedback that it is not active.

5. Registration, form

The website may have a form for registration, contact form or other form. These forms are available to the public to perform the tasks they are supposed to do. Registration form is for visitors to sign up or register. Contact form is for visitors to easily send a message to the website's contact person. We ask for the name of the sender and contact information for this. Personal information we receive is not used for purposes other than responding to the inquiry. The form is sent as email via Mailgun as a third party solution. The entire submission will be stored at Mailgun for 24 hours. Between 24 hours and 30 days, only mailheader is stored before the submission is deleted after 30 days. The reason for this storage is to confirm whether emails are sent from the website and forwarded to the correct recipient. Once the email is received by the recipient, it is up to the recipient to determine the data processing needs of the email.

6. Page and service functionality

Cookies are used in the operation and presentation of data from websites. Such cookies may contain language code information for languages ​​selected by the user. There may be cookies with information supporting the load balancing of the system, ensuring all users the best possible experience. For services that require login or search, cookies can be used to ensure that the service presents data to the right recipient.

7. How to manage cookies in your browser

On www.nettvett.no, read how to configure your browser to accept / reject cookies, and get tips for safer use of the internet.