Health

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Tissue sampling of Christmas anchovies (actually European sprat, Sprattus sprattus). Photo: Åge Hojem, NTNU Vitenskapsmuseet.jpg

Norwegian Christmas food spills its beans

During Christmas you may begin to wonder if the patties really contain pork, the herring in the tomato sauce really is herring, if the sausages contain beef, or if the Christmas anchovies have anchovies in them. No need to fret, DNA barcoding can confirm the identity of what you’re eating this Christmas.

May-Britt Moser shows a video during her Nobel Lecture on 7 December that illustrates how persistence and determination can make "the impossible possible." Photo: Gunnar K. Hansen, NTNU

Many memories, many rooms

2014 NOBEL PRIZE: The brain has an enormous capacity to store memories and to keep memories from getting mixed up in part because of how these memories are stored in the hippocampus, researchers from NTNU’s Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience have shown.

2014 Nobel Prize

Nobel lectures touch on central discoveries and tantalizing findings

2014 NOBEL PRIZE: Nobel Laureates and neuroscientists May-Britt and Edvard Moser described how they made their prize-winning discovery in their Nobel lectures on Sunday 7 December. They also gave the audience a tantalizing glimpse into new findings, including the existence of speed cells in the brain, and how odours and memory are linked.

Skjermdump jazzvideo

A “wow” ending of fog, jazz poetry and a tuba

2014 NOBEL PRIZE: Edvard and May-Britt Moser finished their Nobel lecture with a music video where NTNU music professors improvised over a Norwegian folk tune. The video was filmed in a dense fog where viewers see the faces of the musicians as they play.

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The Nobel Dance

2014 NOBEL PRIZE: Nobel laureate and NTNU Professor May-Britt Moser was full of joy when she learned she had won the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with her husband, Edvard Moser, and their former mentor, John O’Keefe.

Hjerneforskerne May-Britt og Edvard Moser.

From bomb shelter beginnings to the Nobel Prize

2014 NOBEL PRIZE — Nearly all innovations have founder myths, like the apocryphal garage where Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak are said to have developed the Apple Computer. But two innovative neuroscientists in Trondheim really did start their research in the university equivalent of a garage – a bomb shelter – and then went on to build a world-class laboratory and win the Nobel Prize.

from Thinkstock.com

Low-carbon electricity future is clean and feasible

The countries of the world wrapped up preliminary climate talks in Lima, Peru this weekend with an agreement on how the UN’s 194 countries will tackle climate change. The agreement comes in advance of major negotiations scheduled for Paris next year to designed to curb the world’s production of greenhouse gases. In a publication from earlier this year, researchers at NTNU’s Industrial Ecology Programme report that the low-carbon future that would result from curbing greenhouse gas emissions is both feasible from a practical standpoint, and will also substantially reduce air pollution.

Ebola

Ebola’s deadly toll on healthcare workers

Ebola’s deadly effects on the Sierra Leonean healthcare community not only has repercussions for the delivery of health care now, but on the training of future health care providers involved in an innovative Norwegian surgical training programme.

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Healthy working environment is a salvation

Contract workers in Norway often face the worst and most unpredictable working conditions. But good management and support from colleagues makes these workers more robust.

Paul Dommersnes og Jon Otto Fossum har laget mosaikk-kapsler, som kan få betydning innenfor alt fra medisin til malingsproduksjon. Foto: Per Harald Olsen, NTNU

Small capsules, big potential

A conversation between two physicists in a Paris café led to the invention of a novel form of capsules that could be used in medicine, food, household products, cosmetics and paints. Their find has just been published in the latest issue of Nature Communications.

Digital human face

“Virtual human” unlocks key mechanisms of high blood pressure

Scientists regularly use computer models to understand complex problems, from predicting the weather to designing boats and automobiles. Now they are also using this approach to better understand the human body — including the causes behind high blood pressure.

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Norwegian ultrasound technology in Cape Town

Norwegian researchers have installed a system that uses 3D ultrasound and image guidance in one of Africa’s biggest children’s hospitals. This could make it easier to treat brain diseases in children.

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Hunting lung tumors

The innumerable divisions of the bronchi often turn the hunt for tumours in the lungs into a game of chance. But soon, lung specialists will be able to navigate accurately inside the airways by “GPS”.

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Lifesaving sensor for full bladders

A small pressure sensor can make the difference between life and death. The first tests on humans will be carried out in April on patients with spinal injuries at Sunnaas Hospital in Norway.

Seminavis robusta, stained with Aniline Blue, autofluorescence chloroplasts

Learning from algae

By controlling the sex life of algae, scientists can promote the properties they want.

Kavli researchers Sheng-Jia Zhang and Jing Ye were the lead authors in the Kavli Institute paper published in Science magazine on 5 April 2013. Photo: Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience, NTNU.

A “light switch” in the brain illuminates neural networks

Researchers from NTNU’s Kavli Institute of Systems Neuroscience are now able to see which cells communicate with each other in the brain by flipping a neural light switch. The results of their efforts are presented in an article in the 5 April 2013issue of Science magazine.

mid adult italian woman banging her head against a wall outside office building. Horizontal shape, copy space

Beating the winter blues

The lack of sufficient daylight in northern climes makes many tired and depressed. But don’t worry, researchers have come up with ways to counteract the winter blues.